Deadline for WSOY Community Food Drive Grants is Nov. 9

Deadline for WSOY Community Food Drive Grants is Nov. 9

November 1 – The deadline for food pantries and feeding programs to apply for funding from the 17th annual WSOY Community Food Drive is next Friday, November 9.

Applications are reviewed and assessed by the WSOY Food Drive Committee based on information provided.

Fund availability from the WSOY Community Food Drive is not guaranteed, and amounts distributed are determined by donations received during this year’s Food Drive.

Should a WSOY Community Food Drive grant be awarded, the funds must solely be used for the purchase of food; funds cannot be used for administrative costs, transportation, delivery, food storage or processing or other programs or services offered by the agency.

The application form can be found below.

Grant Application 2018

 

Food Drive Total Up to 1.51M; St. Pat’s Tops Schools

Food Drive Total Up to 1.51M; St. Pat’s Tops Schools

October 8 – An updated final total from Friday’s 17th annual WSOY Community Food Drive showed 1.51 million pounds worth of food donations and monetary contributions, while St. Patrick Catholic School officially finished atop the top five schools in contributions.

The new total announced on Monday’s broadcast of Byers & Co. came in at 1,510,412 pounds – 7,360 more than the amount reported immediately after the 12-hour food drive.

After placing second a year ago, St. Pat’s claimed the $2,500 first-place prize with its total of 246,790. Reigning champion St. Teresa High School came in second, followed by Mt. Zion High, Our Lady of Lourdes and Warrensburg-Latham.

Falling just short of the top five were Maroa-Forsyth, Dennis, Holy Family, Eisenhower and Parsons.

Late Push Carries WSOY Community Food Drive Over Goal

Late Push Carries WSOY Community Food Drive Over Goal

October 5 – With a surge of donations over the final hour, the 17th annual WSOY Community Food Drive reached its goal by raising 1.5 million pounds of food for area social service agencies and local food pantries.

“From a community perspective, the community came out today and took care of its own. Seventeen years it has been doing this,” said Mike Hulvey, Vice President and COO of Neuhoff Communications, parent company of WSOY. “Communities much, much larger than ours do not have the same result that we do because this community truly cares about its own residents who need helping hands up, not hands out. That was what today was.”

The final total of 1,503,052 pounds of food brought the total amount raised in the history of Food Drive to nearly 11 million pounds.

“The goal is so important because the need never gets less and that need doesn’t get met, which is sad,” said Hulvey. “But we set a bar for the community to reach to take care of its own, and you want to hit that number.”

The last hour saw close to 160,00 pounds coming in, with matching donations helping reach the target amount. A large group from Coziahr Harley-Davidson was among the last to arrive just before 6 p.m. at the Kroger grocery store in Airport Plaza on East U.S. 36.

“That last hour was frantic, but when all those motorcycles pulled up and the food was coming out of the motorcycles and phone calls were coming in – magic,” said Hulvey. “Absolutely magic.”

St. Patrick Catholic School secured the top prize of $2,500 for collecting the most food among schools. The competition remained close with late donations coming in; final totals and prizes for the other top five schools will be announced Monday.

WSOY Community Food Drive Enters Final Hour

WSOY Community Food Drive Enters Final Hour

October 5 – With one hour to go, the 17th annual WSOY Community Food Drive approached 90 percent of its target of last year’s 1.52 million pounds of food.

Through 11 hours of the fundraiser, collections had totaled 1,343,206 pounds. The food drive collected more than 9.4 million pounds of food in its first 16 years.

The collection of non-perishable food items and monetary donations will area numerous area social service agencies and help stock local food pantries.

First Christian Volunteers Answer Call to Help Food Drive

First Christian Volunteers Answer Call to Help Food Drive

October 5 – B.J. Leonard of First Christian Church has been overseeing the phone bank for the WSOY Community Food Drive for eight years.

“Every year, FCC is glad to be involved in this,” said Leonard. “It’s made possible because we have great volunteers, people who are willing to get up early and be there at 5:30 in order to get the phones ready.

“There’s a lot of prep that goes into it and a lot of tear-down afterwards. But it’s all worth it and we’re glad to be able to get involved.”

Operators at First Christian were accepting phone donations all throughout the Food Drive, and were prepared to answer calls as late as needed.

“Depending on how close the school race is, people are throwing in those last-second pledges,” he said.

So just how busy was the phone bank on Friday?

“I made 200 copies of pledge sheets and we’ve already run out of those,” he said shortly after 4 p.m. “So I can tell you that we’ve had a little more than $35,000 come in just through the phones today.”

Leonard views the Food Drive as an event that brings together all walks of life.

“The Food Drive is a great opportunity for people from all over the community to come together and join a common cause,” he said. “It cuts across denominational lines, it cuts across political lines, it cuts across even socio-economic lines.

“It really is a leveling opportunity for everyone to come together and do something great for our community. Over a million pounds of food is mind-boggling.”

WSOY Community Food Drive Has Seen Tremendous Growth

WSOY Community Food Drive Has Seen Tremendous Growth

October 5 – Kevin Breheny vividly remembers a chilly November weekend in 2002 when the WSOY Community Food Drive made its debut in the parking lot of the Kroger grocery store on East U.S. 36 in Decatur.

“It was very cold. It was right here. We had a little hut and a fire going,” said Breheny, president of J.L. Hubbard Insurance and Bonds. “We did it for two days, Friday and Saturday.”

That first year the Food Drive met its goal of collecting 35,000 pounds to help social service agencies and local food pantries.

“It’s just amazing. Who would’ve ever thought that we’d be raising 1,500,000 pounds of food? We hope to do it two years in a row, we’re getting close,” Breheny said as the 17th annual WSOY Community Food Drive pushed its total to 1,226,333 pounds with three hours remaining.

“People got on board; it just grew over the years and gained momentum. We’ve just got to keep doing it and taking care of those who are hungry.”

Breheny, who helped co-host during the 12-hour broadcast on WSOY, said he was privileged to be a part of the event.

“This community is just phenomenal, and I think people have just gone out of their way this year to make this a success. It’s busier than I’ve ever seen, the donations are more. The institutions are coming up with bigger gifts.

“People love this community and they want to take care of those who are in need.”

Skeff Distributing Helps Food Drive Approach Goal

Skeff Distributing Helps Food Drive Approach Goal

October 5 – John Skeffington marveled at the efficiency of the 17th annual WSOY Community Food Drive on Friday, heaping credit on those donating their time.

“It’s very impressive, and it’s because of the volunteers,” said Skeffington, the President and CEO of Skeff Distributing. “Many of them have been around for a long time. This is kind of a well-oiled machine.

“People are coming in and they spend no time here before somebody’s taking their donations or taking food off their trucks. It’s all incredibly well-orchestrated.”

The collection of non-perishable food items and monetary donations runs until 6 p.m. at the Kroger grocery store on U.S. 36 in Decatur. The goal is to top last year’s record of 1.52 million pounds of donations over 12 hours.

Skeff Distributing has been one of the sponsors of the annual fundraiser from the very beginning. On top of the $1,000 sponsorship donation, Skeff brought in more than 850 pounds of food as part of a supplemental contribution of $1,300.

“Decatur is an incredibly giving community, always has been in good times and bad,” said Skeffington. “The good thing is Decatur is coming back.”